Macintosh computer

THIS IS A COMPANION WEBSITE FOR THE EXHIBITION “HISTORY OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY” IN THE MEC LIBRARY ARCHIVES

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Item on display in the Archives:

Macintosh computer, 1984

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The Macintosh computer was released in January of 1984, with 128K RAM of memory. It quickly became obvious that this was insufficient, so eight months later Apple released an updated version, un-officially referred to as the ‘Fat Mac’. It has 512K RAM, four times as much.

Before the Macintosh, all computers were ‘text-based’ – you operated them by typing words onto the keyboard. The Macintosh is run by activating pictures (icons) on the screen with a small hand-operated device called a “mouse”. Most modern-day computers now operate on this principle, including modern Apple computers and most others which run the Microsoft Windows operating system. (Read more)

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The History of the Apple Macintosh

“Insanely great” – Steve Jobs could hardly put into words his enthusiasm by the launch of the Macintosh. On the legendary annual general meeting of January 24th, 1984, in the Flint Center not far from the Apple Campus in Cupertino, the Apple co-founder initially quoted Bob Dylan’s “The Times They Are A-Changin’” in order to then polemicize against an imminent predominance of the young computer industry by IBM. (Read more)

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Timeline of Computer History

Apple introduces the Macintosh with a television commercial during the 1984 Super Bowl, which plays on the theme of totalitarianism in George Orwell´s book 1984. The ad featured the destruction of “Big Brother” – a veiled reference to IBM — through the power of personal computing found in a Macintosh. The Macintosh was the first successful mouse-driven computer with a graphical user interface and was based on the Motorola 68000 microprocessor. Its price was $2,500. Applications that came as part of the package included MacPaint, which made use of the mouse, and MacWrite, which demonstrated WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get) word processing. (Read more)

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